Books I like

  • Cable Cowboy by Mark Robichaux
    • Great primer on the cable industry in the US in the 1970s to the early 2000s. Mainly focuses on John Malone and TCI, but heavily features other notable cable companies and CEOs.
  • Order Without Design by Alain Bertaud
  • The Prince by Niccolo Machiavelli (translated by Peter Constantine)
  • The Rise of Theodore Roosevelt by Edmund Morris
    • Every man on earth should read this book (and the whole trilogy!)
  • How to Think About War: An Ancient Guide to Foreign Policy by Thucydides (translated by Johanna Hanink)
    • This was my first foray into Greek classics (the only other work I’d read was The Odyssey in high school) as part of a goal to read more of them, and I felt particularly energized by Pericles’ speeches.
  • Up From Slavery by Booker T. Washington
  • Distant Force by George A. Roberts
    • Focuses on Teledyne, the #1 company by shareholder returns in the latter half of the 20th century. The cofounder and CEO, Henry Singleton, is *the* master capital allocator, and had worked with or knew just about everyone, including Richard Feynman (MIT classmate and Putnam Prize teammate) to Claude Shannon (Teledyne board member and long-time shareholder).
    • The author is not great on elaborating. The whole books is basically a giant list of actions that Teledyne and Singleton did, so if you’re interested in that, I recommend it. If you were hoping for something more akin to a biography, this isn’t it (though there are a few good anecdotes).
  • The Remains of the Day by Kazuo Ishiguro
    • I think this novel should especially be read by people with great ambition.
    • Ishiguro won the Nobel Prize in Literature for one of his other works, but I personally think this one deserved it more.
  • The Collected Schizophrenias by Esme Wang
    • First person account on living with schizophrenia.
  • Ender’s Game by Orson Scott Card
    • I’ve only read the first book, so I can’t speak for the rest of the series.
  • The Grand Strategy of the Habsburg Empire by A. Wess Mitchell
  • The Corporation That Changed the World by Nick Robins
    • Short, but very informative read on the history of the British East India Company. This one doesn’t shy away from mentioning the crimes committed by the Company, and gives great background on how financial markets and corporate structures were shaped and evolved in Britain. 
    • My only complaint is that the author spends far too much time on talking about certain buildings and streets 😦